Tag Archives: licence

ASIC cancels rental company’s credit licence


An appliance rental company in north-western Victoria has had its credit licence cancelled by the Australian financial regulator for deliberately targeting vulnerable people in remote aboriginal communities.


Zaam Rentals was renting household goods to poor indigenous people near Mildura that they were to pay for with their Centerlink benefits.


The Australian Securities and Investments Commission (ASIC) launched an investigation into the company after families dealing with Zaam spoke out on 730 Victoria late last year.


ASIC has now banned the company’s director and former director from credit activities for at least the next four years and has cancelled Zaam’s credit license.


The investigation found the company failed to make inquiries into the financial circumstances of its customers and did not make necessary disclosures in its contracts.


ASIC commissioner Peter Kell says Zaam targeted people with a limited understanding of contracts and a minimal capacity to make repayments.

Topics: consumer-protection, aboriginal, mildura-3500

Warning of driving licence fines

12 January 2013 Last updated at 00:01 GMT Victoria Ford Updating the licence is a vital legal requirement, says Victoria Ford of DVLA Many drivers face a fine of £1,000 if they fail to update their photo-card driving licences, according to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.

It started issuing photo-card licences 15 years ago and more than 30 million drivers now have one.

These are usually valid for 10 years and there is a legal requirement for drivers to renew the photograph at the same time as they renew their licence.

However, two million drivers have failed to do this.

And this means they could be fined up to £1,000 should they be pulled over by the police, who then discover that the photo and licence is out of date.

Even failing to notify the DVLA that you have changed address could be costly.

Checking your licence

Photo-card driving licences are set to become mandatory in 2015, when paper licences are officially phased out.

Victoria Ford from the DVLA believes the reasons for updating the photograph on your licence is clear.

“Appearances can change and it is important that photo-card licences are updated every 10 years to ensure the police and other enforcement agencies have the best possible photograph to help them correctly identify whether a driving licence is being used fraudulently,” she says.

“This helps prevent driving licence impersonation – stopping disqualified and perhaps dangerous drivers taking to our roads.”

If you change your address or name, you have to tell the DVLA, so that your driving licence and car registration details can be updated.

Towards the bottom of the card, you will find the address the authorities have for you.

Normally the cost of renewing a licence is £20 but if you are merely updating your address, your new licence will be free.

Lack of knowledge

Research from LV Car Insurance shows that nearly a fifth of drivers they interviewed had no idea when their licence would run out, even though the expiry date is clearly shown on the front of the licence.

Paul Watters Drivers can make numerous checks online to stay on the right side of the law, says the AA’s Paul Watters

One in 10 admitted they had not renewed their licence for more than 10 years.

The DVLA says that it sends letters to drivers whose licences are about to expire, but it is concerned that not everyone will check.

But it is not just failure to keep your licence up to date that can land drivers in hot water.

Paul Watters from the AA thinks there are a number of other issues that drivers are not even aware of, but which could cost them dear.

“There are quite a few things that drivers can be innocently get caught up in. For example, they may have insured their car, but their details may not appear on the Motor Insurance Database,” he says.

“Also many people don’t check their V5 document to see if their car is registered to the correct address. You can check these things online,” he points out.

The continuous insurance enforcement penalty is £100 and a failure to register a vehicle can be a £1,000 fine in the courts.

Warning of driving licence fines

Updating the licence is a vital legal requirement, says Victoria Ford of DVLA Many drivers face a fine of £1,000 if they fail to update their photo-card driving licences, according to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.


It started issuing photo-card licences 15 years ago and more than 30 million drivers now have one.


These are usually valid for 10 years and there is a legal requirement for drivers to renew the photograph at the same time as they renew their licence.


However, two million drivers have failed to do this.


And this means they could be fined up to £1,000 should they be pulled over by the police, who then discover that the photo and licence is out of date.


Even failing to notify the DVLA that you have changed address could be costly.

Checking your licence

Photo-card driving licences are set to become mandatory in 2015, when paper licences are officially phased out.

Victoria Ford from the DVLA believes the reasons for updating the photograph on your licence is clear.


“Appearances can change and it is important that photo-card licences are updated every 10 years to ensure the police and other enforcement agencies have the best possible photograph to help them correctly identify whether a driving licence is being used fraudulently,” she says.


“This helps prevent driving licence impersonation – stopping disqualified and perhaps dangerous drivers taking to our roads.”


If you change your address or name, you have to tell the DVLA, so that your driving licence and car registration details can be updated.


Towards the bottom of the card, you will find the address the authorities have for you.


Normally the cost of renewing a licence is £20 but if you are merely updating your address, your new licence will be free.

Lack of knowledge

Research from LV Car Insurance shows that nearly a fifth of drivers they interviewed had no idea when their licence would run out, even though the expiry date is clearly shown on the front of the licence.

Paul Watters Drivers can make numerous checks online to stay on the right side of the law, says the AA’s Paul Watters

One in 10 admitted they had not renewed their licence for more than 10 years.


The DVLA says that it sends letters to drivers whose licences are about to expire, but it is concerned that not everyone will check.


But it is not just failure to keep your licence up to date that can land drivers in hot water.


Paul Watters from the AA thinks there are a number of other issues that drivers are not even aware of, but which could cost them dear.


“There are quite a few things that drivers can be innocently get caught up in. For example, they may have insured their car, but their details may not appear on the Motor Insurance Database,” he says.


“Also many people don’t check their V5 document to see if their car is registered to the correct address. You can check these things online,” he points out.


The continuous insurance enforcement penalty is £100 and a failure to register a vehicle can be a £1,000 fine in the courts.

Warning of driving licence fines

Victoria Ford Updating the licence is a vital legal requirement, says Victoria Ford of DVLA Many drivers face a fine of £1,000 if they fail to update their photo-card driving licences, according to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.


It started issuing photo-card licences 15 years ago and more than 30 million drivers now have one.


These are usually valid for 10 years and there is a legal requirement for drivers to renew the photograph at the same time as they renew their licence.


However, two million drivers have failed to do this.


And this means they could be fined up to £1,000 should they be pulled over by the police, who then discover that the photo and licence is out of date.


Even failing to notify the DVLA that you have changed address could be costly.

Checking your licence

Photo-card driving licences are set to become mandatory in 2015, when paper licences are officially phased out.

Victoria Ford from the DVLA believes the reasons for updating the photograph on your licence is clear.


“Appearances can change and it is important that photo-card licences are updated every 10 years to ensure the police and other enforcement agencies have the best possible photograph to help them correctly identify whether a driving licence is being used fraudulently,” she says.


“This helps prevent driving licence impersonation – stopping disqualified and perhaps dangerous drivers taking to our roads.”


If you change your address or name, you have to tell the DVLA, so that your driving licence and car registration details can be updated.


Towards the bottom of the card, you will find the address the authorities have for you.


Normally the cost of renewing a licence is £20 but if you are merely updating your address, your new licence will be free.

Lack of knowledge

Research from LV Car Insurance shows that nearly a fifth of drivers they interviewed had no idea when their licence would run out, even though the expiry date is clearly shown on the front of the licence.

Paul Watters Drivers can make numerous checks online to stay on the right side of the law, says the AA’s Paul Watters

One in 10 admitted they had not renewed their licence for more than 10 years.


The DVLA says that it sends letters to drivers whose licences are about to expire, but it is concerned that not everyone will check.


But it is not just failure to keep your licence up to date that can land drivers in hot water.


Paul Watters from the AA thinks there are a number of other issues that drivers are not even aware of, but which could cost them dear.


“There are quite a few things that drivers can be innocently get caught up in. For example, they may have insured their car, but their details may not appear on the Motor Insurance Database,” he says.


“Also many people don’t check their V5 document to see if their car is registered to the correct address. You can check these things online,” he points out.


The continuous insurance enforcement penalty is £100 and a failure to register a vehicle can be a £1,000 fine in the courts.

Warning of driving licence fines

Victoria Ford Updating the licence is a vital legal requirement, says Victoria Ford of DVLA Many drivers face a fine of £1,000 if they fail to update their photo-card driving licences, according to the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency.


It started issuing photo-card licences 15 years ago and more than 30 million drivers now have one.


These are usually valid for 10 years and there is a legal requirement for drivers to renew the photograph at the same time as they renew their licence.


However, two million drivers have failed to do this.


And this means they could be fined up to £1,000 should they be pulled over by the police, who then discover that the photo and licence is out of date.


Even failing to notify the DVLA that you have changed address could be costly.

Checking your licence

Photo-card driving licences are set to become mandatory in 2015, when paper licences are officially phased out.

Victoria Ford from the DVLA believes the reasons for updating the photograph on your licence is clear.


“Appearances can change and it is important that photo-card licences are updated every 10 years to ensure the police and other enforcement agencies have the best possible photograph to help them correctly identify whether a driving licence is being used fraudulently,” she says.


“This helps prevent driving licence impersonation – stopping disqualified and perhaps dangerous drivers taking to our roads.”


If you change your address or name, you have to tell the DVLA, so that your driving licence and car registration details can be updated.


Towards the bottom of the card, you will find the address the authorities have for you.


Normally the cost of renewing a licence is £20 but if you are merely updating your address, your new licence will be free.

Lack of knowledge

Research from LV Car Insurance shows that nearly a fifth of drivers they interviewed had no idea when their licence would run out, even though the expiry date is clearly shown on the front of the licence.

Paul Watters Drivers can make numerous checks online to stay on the right side of the law, says the AA’s Paul Watters

One in 10 admitted they had not renewed their licence for more than 10 years.


The DVLA says that it sends letters to drivers whose licences are about to expire, but it is concerned that not everyone will check.


But it is not just failure to keep your licence up to date that can land drivers in hot water.


Paul Watters from the AA thinks there are a number of other issues that drivers are not even aware of, but which could cost them dear.


“There are quite a few things that drivers can be innocently get caught up in. For example, they may have insured their car, but their details may not appear on the Motor Insurance Database,” he says.


“Also many people don’t check their V5 document to see if their car is registered to the correct address. You can check these things online,” he points out.


The continuous insurance enforcement penalty is £100 and a failure to register a vehicle can be a £1,000 fine in the courts.


View the original article here

Zynga seeks US gambling licence

6 December 2012 Last updated at 22:50 GMT Zynga headquarters Zynga developed hit games Farmville and Mafia Wars Games developer Zynga has taken the first step to apply for a gambling licence from the US state of Nevada.

Zynga, behind the popular Farmville game, has asked for an “application for a preliminary finding of suitability” from the Nevada Gaming Control Board.

It said that the process with Nevada should take up to 18 months, after which it can apply for a gaming licence.

Zynga plans to launch real-money gambling games in the UK next year.

The company has been struggling for new revenues beyond its successful games like Farmville and Words for Friends. It recently amended its agreement with Facebook, where figures suggest 80% of its revenue came from.

Zynga now has its own games platform, but players will no longer be able to share their progress on Facebook.

It did not say what it plans to do with a Nevada gambling licence.

In August, a real-money gambling app called Bingo Friendzy was launched on Facebook. The app’s activities are licensed and regulated by the government of Gibraltar, allowing it to offer titles in the UK.

In the United States the situation with real-money online gambling is more complicated – the law currently forbids banks and others offering payment processing services to betting services targeted at US citizens.

Low-cost licence plan for small Adelaide venues

Updated November 28, 2012 14:43:29

Adelaide City Council has asked the South Australian Government to make some changes to its proposed late night code for venues.

The council is worried some restaurants and smaller venues may have to do the same as large nightclubs, by switching to safer, unbreakable glassware after midnight and installing metal detectors at their premises.

Councillor Natasha Malani said smaller venues did not attract the same level of alcohol-related violence and behavioural problems as bigger ones.

“We’re encouraging smaller venues to establish in the city. They attract a different person who comes and wines and dines and wants a different experience to a nightclub experience and we should be encouraging that service,” she said.

Lord Mayor Stephen Yarwood said the cost of implementing some planned changes would be a barrier for small business.

“We really want to make sure that small bars in the city are supported in a way that’s actually going to help the long-term vibrancy and add to city safety,” he said.

A staff member for the state Planning and Business Services Minister said smaller venues had little to fear, as the provisions would make clear it was large venues operating into the early hours which needed to comply with the new requirements.

Planning and Business Services Minister John Rau said the Government would ensure start-up businesses could obtain low-cost, minimal-documentation liquor licences, easing some of the legal and cost issues they would otherwise face.

The low-cost option would assume the business operated in hours somewhere between 11:00am and midnight with a maximum capacity of 120 people. Applications would be taken for exemptions to trade until 2:00am.

Topics: local-government, hospitality, government-and-politics, states-and-territories, crime-prevention, law-crime-and-justice, adelaide-5000, sa

First posted November 28, 2012 09:28:16

Kingfisher’s flying licence suspended

New Delhi: The flying licence of India’s Kingfisher Airlines was suspended on Saturday after the debt-laden carrier failed to satisfy the aviation regulator’s concerns about its operations, an official said.

The licence of the airline, whose fleet has been grounded for days due to a strike over unpaid salaries, has been suspended until it presents a “viable” revival plan, R.K. Khanna, the deputy director general of civil aviation, said.

Kingfisher, which has billions of dollars in debts, has not paid staff for seven months and is desperately seeking a foreign buyer to save it from complete collapse.

Relations between the Kingfisher management and its staff reached a boiling point last month after the company declined to commit when it would settle its dues, prompting employees to boycott work.

Article continues below

“The stage had come when the airline neither had engineers nor pilots at work. There was nobody to certify or actually fly the planes,” Khanna told AFP.

“Kingfisher’s [flying] permit has been suspended… till they show us a viable revival plan and are able to prove to us that it is a safe, efficient and reliable service,” he said.

Much of the criticism for the airline’s decline has been directed at Vijay Mallya, the billionaire who owns the company, and his flamboyant lifestyle.

But while the future of the tycoon’s empire — spanning beer, whiskey, a cricket team and fertilisers — is not seen in doubt, recent moves suggest he too is facing a financial crunch.

His flagship United Breweries (UB), India’s biggest brewer, is in talks to sell a stake of the profitable liquor empire to Diageo, the world’s largest distiller, which analysts say could raise $800 million (Dh2.94 billion).

The 56-year-old is also desperate for a foreign airline to pump fresh capital into Kingfisher after India relaxed its investment policies last month.

But analysts are doubtful anyone will come forward to rescue a company drowning in a debt pile estimated at $2.49 billion by the Center for Asia Pacific Aviation, an airline industry research group.

A pilot with the airline said the situation surrounding the airline was “one big farce”.

“Employees are being blamed for the crisis, which is a shame. Did we bring the airline to this situation?” he told AFP, declining to be named.

He said the striking staff — which includes pilots and engineers — would continue to agitate to recover their long-overdue salaries.

The company was India’s second-largest airline until a year ago but now it has a market share of just 3.5 per cent, the smallest of the country’s carriers.

The airline has drastically reduced its operations in the past year, shutting down international flights completely.

Oil exploration licence granted for Sindh block

Kuwait compan­y’s subsid­iary will invest $3.3m in phase-I.  Kirthar Pakistan is a wholly owned subsidiary of Kufpec, which is active in Africa, Middle East, Far East, Australia and Southeast Asia. PHOTO: FILE

ISLAMABAD: 

The government has granted exploration licence for a block in district Thatta (Sindh) to Kirthar Pakistan BV – the operator – and Pakistan Petroleum Limited (PPL), which have 75% and 25% working interests respectively.


According to a statement issued here on Friday, the joint venture has committed to undertake work at the site by investing $3.3 million during Phase-l, which is spread over three years. The work programme includes a seismic survey and drilling of two exploration wells.


The exploration licence and petroleum concession agreement were signed by Petroleum and Natural Resources Secretary Dr Waqar Masood Khan, Director General Petroleum Concessions Qazi Mohammad Saleem Siddiqui, Kuwait Foreign Petroleum Exploration Company (Kufpec) Deputy Managing Director A Naser Y AI-Fulaij and PPL CEO and Managing Director Asim Murtaza Khan. Adviser to Prime Minister on Petroleum and Natural Resources Dr Asim Hussain was also present.


Kirthar Pakistan is a wholly owned subsidiary of Kufpec, which is active in Africa, Middle East, Far East, Australia and Southeast Asia. The company has been active in Pakistan since the mid-1980s and holds working interests in Qadirpur, Zamzama, Kadanwari, Bhit and Bhadra, Sukhpur and Zarghun blocks.


The licence has been granted on government-to-government basis under the Petroleum Exploration and Production Policy 2009, which will help cope with challenges faced in meeting energy needs.


According to the statement, Asim Hussain has emphasised that new exploration licences and petroleum concession agreements form an integral part of the government’s drive to attract investment in the oil and gas sector. Maximum number of exploration licences might be granted to multinational, public sector and local exploration and production companies, which would help achieve the desired goals and cater to the energy needs of the country, he said.


Published in The Express Tribune, October 13th, 2012.


View the original article here

Foreign firm gets licence to explore oil, gas in Jati area

ISLAMABAD: The government on Friday granted an exploration licence of bloc No. 2467-14 (Jati) falling in Zone-III to Kirthar Pakistan B.V. (KPBV) (Operator) and Pakistan Petroleum Limited (PPL) holding 75 percent and 25 percent working interests, respectively, covering an area of 2465.33 sq-km located in district Thatta, according to a statement.

The joint venture has committed to undertake 330 work units in the licence area, amounting to $3.3 million during the Phase-l (first three years) of the initial term of the licence, it said.

The work programme includes 500 line km 2D seismic survey and drilling of two exploration wells.

KPBV is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Kuwait Foreign Petroleum Exploration Company (KUFPEC), existing under the laws of The Netherlands. KUFPEC is active in Africa, the Middle East, Far East, Australia and South East Asia regions, according to the statement.

The company has been active in Pakistan since the middle of 1980 and currently holding working interests in Qadirpur, Zamzama, Kadanwari, Bhit and Bhadra, Sukhpur and Zarghun blocs. The licence has been granted on government-to-government basis under the provision of Petroleum Exploration & Production Policy 2009.

The execution ceremony was witnessed by Dr Asim Hussain, adviser to the prime minister on petroleum and natural resources, it said. The exploration licence and the petroleum concession agreement were signed by Dr Waqar Masood Khan, secretary petroleum and natural resources, Qazi Mohammad Saleem Siddiqui, director general of Petroleum Concessions, A Naser Y AI-Fulaij, deputy managing director, KUFPEC, and Asim Murtaza Khan, CEO and managing director, PPL.

View the original article here